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believed them. today's report says that much never happen again. >> learning about science may become a thing of the past for school children in indonesia. the government wants to cancel science class is to make more room for religion and nationalism. teachers say it is a move backwards. >> learning about the newton laws of motion by launching a rocket. it is a fun exercise for children around the world. indonesian children might soon miss out on such experiments. if the government goes ahead with its plan to take science out of the curriculum. >> science is cool, lots of useful objects can be made through science. with science, we can create unique objects. when i grow up, i want to be a professor in biotechnology. professor in biotechnology.
. tonight, jim's got two exclusives. the ceos of nps pharma and exact sciences just ahead. >>> and later, king of the hill. they're the two top performers in the dow last year. but 2013 isn't big enough for both of them. with the big mortgage settlement behind them, could bank of america deposit returns for you this year, or should the housing rebound keep home depot in your sights? cramer decides. all coming up on "mad money." >>> don't miss a second of "mad money." follow @jimcramer on twitter. send jim an e-mail at jimcramercnbc.com or call 1-800-743-cnbc. miss something? head to madmoney.cnbc.com. with the spark cash card from capital one, sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great businesses deserve great rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on ev
ensure that rules are based on good data and sound science. third, we are going to see -- you're going to see a significant respond to expand the expertise of our law firm, the national chamber litigation center. and in other areas of our institution in order to deal with expanding regulation. our preference is always to work within the legislative and regulatory process. and we do that on a daily basis, but when rights have been trampled on, our regulators have overstepped their bounds, well, we will then just take necessary legal action. now let me turn to something we should all care about any very important way, that's immigration reform. america has grown because we have attracted and welcome some of the most talented and the hard-working citizens of the world to our shores. immigrants teach in our universities. they invest and invent in our technological companies. they staff our hospitals. they care for our elderly and our young. they harvest our food and they serve in our armed forces. given are changing demographics, we need more workers to sustain our economy. support our ret
is the continued united states pre-eminence, not just in demand space programs but in terms of science and inventions and everything else that goes along with it, and it ended up being washed away in the flood of stimulus france. as this hearing has highlighted already, the president's approach to human spaceflight lacks a clear mission and he is relying on the success of commercial space, which i agreed is vital that has dragged its feet and pushed its flight at nasa. i strongly support a public-private partnership for the country's space policy. however, it is up to nasa to develop the heavy lift rocket because the private sector doesn't have enough funds to do it by itself, and that heavy lift rocket needs enough thrust to overcome the administration shortsightedness. now why cancel inhofe, the international partners who supported the mission, president obama has taken a been there and done that approach but we haven't been there for 40 years and the international partners who would have helped us have never been there. if we cannot lead the world with space, china and russia will i
in science and technology. and we're investing much less than we used to in core areas of education. state universities for example are being decimated. so if you don't invest for the future, where are you going to get the growth in the future? >> but in 2008 and 2009, invest became a bad word, invest became government spending. when you're talking about investing, you're talking about it in a fairly sophisticated manner. some in the government. some the private sector, each on their own and some jointly. that kind of discussion feels dead on arrival in this political environment where we can't get something like a basic budget done. >> the problem is we're going to have to do some of this, anyway. anyone who owns a home knows this. if you defer maintenance, if you say to yourself, my boiler is leaking but i'm not going to fix it, that's actually a penny wise, pound-foolish decision. it will eventually break and cost you three times as much. that's what's happening with our roads, bridges and highways. if you look at air travel. we have one of the world's most antiquated travel systems, we
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. so we created the extraordinarily comfortable sleep number experience. a collection of innovations designed around a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs - each of your bodies. our sleep professionals will help you find your sleep number setting. exclusively at a sleep number store. sleep number. comfort individualized. queen mattresses start at just $699. and now save 50% on the closeout of our silver limited edition bed. ends sunday. >>> welcome back to the second half of "outfront." we start with stories we care about, where we focus on reporting from the front line, and we begin with an "outfront" update to a story we've been following. the army investigating another case of abuse at an army day care center in ft. meyer, virginia. the army, according to a spokesman, was notified yesterday that a child care worker allegedly slapped a child. the incident was reported by another caregiver in the room. the alleged perpetrator
to in infrastructure. we're investing half as much in science and technology. and we're investing much less than we used to in core areas of education -- state universities, for example, are being decima decimated. if you don't invest for the future, where are you going to get the growth? >> but in 2008 and 2009, invest became a bad word. it became government spending. when you're talking about investing, you're talking about a sophisticated manner. some government, some private sector, some on their own and some jointly. >> precisely. >> that kind of discussion feels dead on arrival in this political environment where we can't even get a budget done. >> and the problem is we're going to have to do some of this anyway. anyone who owns a home knows this. if you differ maintenance, my boiler is leaking but i'm not going to fix it, that's penny-wise but pound pool foolish. the whole thing will break and cost you three times the amount. air travel. we have one of the world's most antiquated air traffic systems. we need to update the computers. it's $25 billion. we're not spending that money because as
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: as unemployment, growth and budget concerns continue, the man who will lead president obama's new economic team was formally nominated today. the announcement came this afternoon, the latest in a series of major cabinet changes. >> one reason jack has been so effective in this town is because he is a low-key guy who prefers to surround himself with policy experts rather than t.v. cameras. >> brown: with that, the president introduced his nominee to be the next secretary of the treasury, jack lew, the man he made his chief of staff, a year ago yesterday. lew would succeed tim geithner, who drew fulsome praise from the president. >> when the history books are written tim geithner's going to go down as one o
in science today -- answers hidden in the cousins of cuba's painted snails. interpreter: cuba is known as the paradise of snails. many live here in this area and nowhere else. they have fascinated me since i was a student. and i like them because of their lifestyle -- so free, so relaxed, so interesting. narrator: in one of the most remote regions in cuba biologist emma palacios lemagne is cracking the mysteries of evolution. cuba doesn't provide emma with much money for her research and can't supply her with expensive equipment. but what cuba does give her is one of the most extraordinary laboratories on earth. instead of test tubes, emma uses mammoth limestone karsts called mogotes. centuries of erosion have carved them into towering island worlds a virtual galapagos, where, like darwin's finches emma's snails evolve in extreme isolation. the snails on these separated hills never venture more than 60 feet from home, making this the ideal place for emma to discover how their shapes, colors and behaviors are dictated by the land. interpreter: each slope on these mogot
if it interferes with pleasure or other functions. christian science believes the children should not be taken into the doctor when they're ill is reported to successfully so that has led to an abuse. >> what is going on? is there a substantial burden so otherwise does it justify the invitation? burqa but since it is not irreversible and does not impair other bodily functions. if it is physical or sexual violence then it should be legally punished. of the rise it is in the same category of other requirements that has the unpleasant to parents put on their children. some appear to violate laws against child safety that is when yale professor admitted in her book with tiger mother she forced her daughter to stand outside in the cold without supper and also at the piano without faster access because she did not master a difficult passage of piano work was a child abuse and one wondered why the police were not on her doorstep but the answer was obvious. but that is the sort of thing to intervene. similar tactics could be used to get the girl to wear burqa it is more emotional blackmail like my fat
. [applause] >> thank you very much, everyone, for coming. thank you to the department of political science. today, we have for pronounced -- we have for pamela spirit we will have a bit of discussion between them and then moved to audience discussion. first, deborah is the this -- is a professor of ethics and society. she is also the senior associate dean for the humanities. she is a member of the philosophy department and director for ethics and a society. her research focuses on the ethical limits of the markets. a place of equality in a just society and a rational choice. she also works on ethics and at the -- in education. she is co-editor of the forthcoming collection, occupy the future. he is a graduate of mit and an early participant in occupy washington -- occupy boston. he specializes in web applications and design. a co-founder in danger of some in cambridge. -- actually, just in central square. if he continues to be engaged in outspoken protests, malfeasance, and a finance industry mismanagement. and next is phil thompson. actually, he is on the end. an associate professor. i'm
: supporting nova and promoting public understanding of science. and the corporation for public broadcasting, and by pbs viewers like you. this nova program is available on dvd. to order, visit shoppbs.org, or call 1-800-play-pbs. nova is also available for download on itunes. captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org available now on shoppbs downton still stands. i'm looking forward to all sorts of things. what?! no one must know! i'm warning you... to order, visit shoppbs. also available on itunes. coyle: john bates. i read this character, and there was something... i was drawn to him as much by what he didn't say as by what he did. i thought what he concealed was as interesting as what he revealed a kind of stoicism-- something very old-fashioned but also something quite mysterious as well. there's an element of mystery there. it's all about survival. he survived not losing his job. he survived the return of his wife. and he's now surviving prison, so it's about survival for bates. there are moments of reprieve. falling in love with ann
and assault rifles and so on. they have had no mass shootings since. this is not rocket science. it's there to be had. the problem is that the nra, and i'm sure mr. jones is a big fan of theirs and probably helps them. >> he probably thinks they're way, way,way too much part of the establishment. he's way, way to the right of the nra. >> the political power the nra now wield means that politicians are too coward to say anything. i have people say to me, you're so brave. hot is brave about wanting to stop 20 more children getting murders? >> i don't think it's the nra power. it's people like us, not the two of us, but americans who care about guns aren't doing enough to make our case to the public. >> why not? >> because we think it's their issue. we have given that issue over to them because they have lobbyists they pay money. in the end, the people determine the outcome. and it's wrong, and it's racist and it's bigoted to say that guns are quintessentially american. they may represent a part of america, but my grandparents who came over from poland and live in brooklyn, new york, a
you to the department of political science. today, we have for pronounced -- we have for pamela spirit we will have a bit of discussion between them and then moved to audience discussion. first, deborah is the this -- is a professor of ethics and society. she is also the senior associate dean for the humanities. she is a member of the philosophy department and director for ethics and a society. her research focuses on the ethical limits of the markets. a place of equality in a just society and a rational choice. she also works on ethics and at the -- in education. she is co-editor of the forthcoming collection, occupy the future. he is a graduate of mit and an early participant in occupy washington -- occupy boston. he specializes in web applications and design. a co-founder in danger of some -- danger awesome in cambridge. -- actually, just in central square. if he continues to be engaged in outspoken protests, malfeasance, and a finance industry mismanagement. and next is phil thompson. actually, he is on the end. an associate professor. i'm giving their introductions in the order t
's not rocket science. oversight investigation is not rocket science. i used to teach at american university and i used to teach a lot of courses to cops and prosecutors. this isn't rocket science, and i don't know of age if age should be rocket science. i am very impressed with some people i talk to at a.i.d. has said we really need to design programs knowing where we are working. if we know we are working in the most corrupt country in the world we designed a program that protects the funding. i was very impressed with that. now i haven't seen a program without built-in but people tell me they are thinking about it. somebody told me that her regions do that. yes, circ? >> previously i ran a team for operations under dod to afghanistan. one of the things that i came away with is that afghanistan, afghans are good at running their own businesses. but what we do is we create an incentive whereby running business is about short-term profit. so what we have didn't, is partner with afghan, several afghans over there and we are trying to build electricity infrastructure were afghans actually have
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. cheryl: what do you get when you mix judaism and beer brewing? well, according to the next guest, you get an american-jewish celebration beer. small business, big ideas, this is the best. founder of scmaltz brewers, called hebrew. what inspired you? >> well, hebrew beer is the first and only jewish celebration beer in the united states, high end craft beer marketed to the jewish community and anybody else who loves great beer. cheryl: all my jewish friends are wine drinkers, is there the population? >> yes, we get the question all the time. i thought jews didn't drink beer. that was going to be the bumper sticker in the beginning. we play with stereotypes, and it's important to have a wonderful high end craft beer to celebrate jewish tradition, the calendar, but, also, now craft beer is popular and growing we want to make beers to stand with the best craft beers. cheryl: sales impressive, 125,000 cases sold, $3.5 million in sales. that's not small, th
to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great businesses deserve great rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? here's your invoice. >>> our second story "outfront," football to blame. the national institutes of health says former nfl linebacker junior seau had a degenerative brain disease linked to multiple head traumas when he committed suicide last spring. seau is the latest professional football player to be linked to a disease known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or cte. the findings could mean more trouble for the nfl, which is facing lawsuits involving some 2,000 players, claiming the nfl deliberately hid th
and you can't have those unless you're involved early in science. we developed models where we are integrated into the ecosystems around the world. i was at stanford this morning where the biggest life sciences employer in boston, we have a strong hub in china and in europe. and we are really trying to develop a collaborative open innovative concept. what we put in has to have a strong proof of concept. on vaccines, on drugs that have a clear benefit over existing therapies. because the bar just gets higher and higher from reimbursement authorities every year. >> sure. and does that include transactions -- more transactions in terms of mna? you know, some of your growth has come through acquisitions. going forward in the next three years, does that growth continue to come through acquisitions or organic? >> i think it's going to be more organic. i'll tell you. in our industry, everybody's got a lot of cash. everybody is interested in growing inorganically. it's tough to find deals that have value. because sanofi now grows we have less than 3% subject to small molecule patents e
has been to china many times knows his markets and political science has told us china was way too restrictive in the monetary policy, that somehow the communist party got caught up on worrying about inflation, not worrying about growth. come on, malice, be like mal for heaven sake. i think they're still going with the techs, though. that's over. klaus is confident that when the dpovt unveils the plan for growth in february, they're going to dazzle, from a disappointing 8% to a stunning 11%. there's plenty to like if china gets ho the t in here and takin all its clothes, that's ray lewis. the chinese are addicted to coal. and we know electric uses have gotten stronger and stronger as the year's gone on. got that data. although joy's up about 10% in two weeks. you can look at truck manufacturers as the chinese are back with a vengeance. but i don't know, i don't want to outthink this. the best way to play china is china, specifically the etf for the biggest chinese stocks i've steered you away from owning individual stocks except for brief flirtation with baydu. nevertheless, call m
experiments, and, obviously, his science advisors were interested in all of the different intellectual dimensions of it. he had a very clinical spent i think, that are three stars. he is leaving, no doubt about that, but his to advisors are talking back to them come and that is not easy to do in an oval office. >> which you like. >> and i give them credit hiring brave enough people to talk back to them. it's good conversation among smart people. and the book also gives transcripts of the conversation a year later with the same people in which these smart people have almost reversed position. easy saying, is this too dangerous? should we think more -- the science advisors are saying we're going to spin off so much amazing technology. we're going to define the ninth \60{l1}s{l0}\'60{l1}s{l0} -- 1960s by what we're doing. >> i also love the change in mr. webb a year later as the president is based of asking him, is this the top priority? absolutely, sir. >> i think he also asked whether it can be done on demand. is there a way of doing this? and perhaps part of the shift comes from a kind
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back. we have breaking medical news tonight. the flu outbreak that has been spreading so fast now qualifies as an epidemic according to the national institute of health. here's what he just told cnn. >> if you look at the charts that the cdc put out on their website, it clearly has gone above that threshold, so we're into what would classically be described as a flu epidemic. it's still on the uptick, and usually when you're above that baseline in the flu season, you stay there for about 12 weeks. we're right now at about week five or so. so we still have a way to go. >> long way to go, it's expected to be the worst flu season in years. more than half of the states already reporting widespread outbreaks and officials are saying the cases they're seeing are more severe than last year. emergency rooms across the country are overflowing. boston has declared a public health emergency. more than 2,000 people have been hospitalized. at least 18 children have died from the flu.
is a great company, we've been this business for 32 years. we have tremendous science based products that are high in health and safety and a tremendous business opportunity. we're proud of where we are today and confident about our future. >> after the herbalife meeting ends, michael john so thson wil appear on skauk squawk on the treat. must see tv. this story has legs. >> as an investment story, i can make an argument that perhaps we're overdoing it a bit. but as a story, come on. the fact as of yesterday this new plot twist with dan taking on where he thought his friend, referring to him only, though, as the short seller. i thought that was a little hostile in his letter. just adds another layer of intrigue. and significant money at stake for both hedge funds. >> and herb greenberg has been on this for a very long time. michael johnson has come on my show at mod money. but he has a documentary that's fascinating. in terms of timely, i've never seen anything like it. >> it has been in the works for months. so check it out if you haven't already. called selling the dream. but in te
to go to that is on the far side of the moon that can be the robotic science can do the mining for the ice crystals and convert that into hydrogen and oxygen which is fuel the conference recently as following a workshop that has been sent out in the international learning basis by practicing on the island of hawaii to assemble a large number of large objects. you put the first one down and where are they expected? another one down at some distance away how do you put them together? if it's on hawaii, you do that through a satellite back to the mission control. so you prove that you can do something like that here in the united states. then we do it at the moon. why am i so enthusiastic about that? because that's exactly what we want to do at mars. we want to put people on the moon of mars who can then assemble the base we will then send people and we should assure ourselves we should protect crew members from radiation as much as possible before they ever go somewhere and that's the moon, too. >> kevin has a two-part question and i should ask the second part first. do you belie
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. ♪ ♪ we're lucky, it's not every day you find a companion as loyal as a subaru. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. ♪ oh monday morning ♪ you gave me no warning >>> quite frankly, chuck hagel is out of the mainstream of thinking, i believe, on most issues regarding foreign policy. i expect the president to nominate people different than i would think. i'm going to vote for senator kerry. i don't agree with him a lot, but i think he's very much in the mainstream of thought. chuck hagel, if confirmed to be secretary of defense, would be the most antagonistic secretary of defense toward the nation of israel in our nation's history. he has long severed his ties with the republican party. this is an in-your-face nomination by the president to all of us who are supportive of israel. >> chuck hagel was a republican senator from nebraska, a decorated veteran of the vietnam war, a person who has a resume that include
they realize and could be sackifiesing their safety. we'll talk to our science editor. and then lawmakers but theed heads on the debt ceiling and the gun control debate. we'll get a preview, after the break. yes she is, yes she is. [ bop ] [ male announcer ] could've had a v8. 100% vegetable juice, with three of your daily vegetable servings in every little bottle. with three of your daily vegetable servings excuse me, sir i'm gonna have to ask you to power down your little word game. i think your friends will understand. oh no, it's actually my geico app...see? ...i just uh paid my bill. did you really? from the plane? yeah, i can manage my policy, get roadside assistance, pretty much access geico 24/7. sounds a little too good to be true sir. i'll believe that when pigs fly. ok, did she seriously just say that? geico. just click away with our free mobile app. >> we have just learned that moments ago, president obama signed into law the first of the sandy relief bills, to provide $9.7 billion in flood insurance funds to victims of super storm sandy. congress passed the bill on friday. th
isn't rocket science. it'just common sense. from td ameritrade. melissa: are you ready for a vacation but maybe your wallet isn't? have no fear, there are real deals to be had this year. travelzoo's senior editor is here with his top five money saving vacation picks. thanks for joining us. we've been waiting for this segment all hour. >> it is time, right? time to head out of town. melissa: that's right. you have great tips. before we get to the destinations package travel is cheaper and also to look for seasonalty that maybe you want to look for places where it's shoulder season. is that right? >> that's it. certainly packaging vacations can be a real money saver for you. air fare went up last year. we're expecting air fare to remain high or creep upward in 2013. bundling air fare with hotel stay, activities, more you put together right off the top bigger savings certainly could be. seasonality, huge price driver. new york city, today, you can get a great hotel in mid tan manhattan under 150, or $100. melissa: because it is freezing. no one wants to come here. but let's get to destin
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> nobody knows the pain of gun violence quite like the kennedy family. listen to the conversation with the world's top treatment experts. welcome to you both. >> thank you. >> two kennedys. i can't think of two better people to ask about this debate. and your reaction to the interview i had with alex jones. what did you feel? >> it was disheartening, i think. just to see the anger there and also, you know, he kept talking about the second amendment. the second amendment, thomas jefferson, who wrote the second amendment, said it should be revisited every 20 years to see if it's still appropriate. i mean, this is -- this is something that was written a long time ago. and he probably doesn't even know what the real intent of the second amendment was. so for him to quote this and just the absole vitriol of it is really disheartening. >> i was just disturbed. disturbed as a human being that this is what our civil discourse has come to. what makes our country so great is that we're about passing power pea
that are required by the evolving high value-added economy. and that doesn't just mean skills like math and science although we are now lagging behind 30, 40 other countries in the world in that regard. it also means skills that are associated with creativity and innovation. because our edge as a country comes in the area where we can use our creativity, but we also protect creativity in a way that places like china and others don't and in a content-driven world, a software-driven world, that combination of creative people and a system that promotes and creates and protects creativity is probably our real ace in the hole. >> host: david rothkopf, let's take bob's comment and tie that to your previous book, "superclass." you've mentioned now a couple times that we're creating this class of people way up here, and everybody else is being left behind, in a sense. >> guest: well, the gaps are growing between the richest 1% and, actually, the richest .0001%. and the rest of us. they have benefited more than anybody else in the course of the past ten years. most of the gains that have come, like 90% of t
's not worth it. >> cenk: that's tough to hear every single time. e.s.p.n. explains the science of concussion a little more. >> big blows like this one can be the equivalent of taking a sledgehammer to the head. it's not just pro football. studies show high school football and even pee wee league football players are exposing themselves to the dangers of head trauma. >> he is not alone in committing suicide. recently andre waters, known as dan day dirty waters killed himself, duerson with the bears and ray easter ling. >> game over, politics are turning the sports world upside down. great to talk to you. talk to me about these concussions. that what can it is nfl do about it? >> very little. they find them receivers in a similar position as the tobacco industry, you're never going to make a cigarette safe. similarly, you'll never make the sport of playing football safe, whether you're talking about the pee wee league, high school, pop warner or the nfl. the case of junior, it puts an exclamation point on now what are several years of new medical data we now know about the cost of playing foot
pleasure or bodily function. christian science believes children should not be taken to the doctor has also been of the gate is successfully in some treatment has led to abuse and neglect conviction. important to treat them together is there a burden on the religious freedom? doesn't compel public interest to justify the imposition? 534 miners is not about genital mutilation is not irreversible in danger health or bodily function. if imposed by physical or sexual violence they should be legally punishable never it is in the same category as other requirements that parents impose on their children. some practices to file a lot of child safety headsman blind law professor from yale law school admitted in her book the tiger mother she forced her daughter to stand outside in the cold without supper and also at the piano without bath to access the kitschy had not mastered a difficult passage. some wondered why the police were not at her doorstep but the answer was she was a law professor but they could intervene. another tactic to get the girl to where it it would be intervention that most are e
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. liz: back here at samsung, drawing a big crowd as things were around and move and everyone is excited. coming up in the next hour, panasonic offers on fox business interview, about exactly what he wants to do to me panasonic more competitive, fox on -- first on fox business interview, major exclusive, dow component in intel. you own stock in your portfolio, it is an exclusive interview with ceo paul otellini. he will ridge he retiring in may and. we will get a first broadcast interview of the. at the end of last year that he was leaving on where they stand on the process. who are the candidates on who will lead the gigantic company. and what about mobile. we will ask about that. and why is he leaving and what he is going to do. it is a huge interview, only speaking to fox business tomorrow and also, the faithful here. you have seen these commercials of the quarterback talking. first on fox business interview, tim tebow joining us to talk about why he picked this company to endorse. he turns down most of the requests. h
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ male announcer ] how do you make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. ashley: alcoa reporting corporate earnings earlier this hour. on the floor of the new york stock exchange. nicole: first we're going to show you where alcoa clothes on the floor of the new york stock exchange. now coming out with earnings per share right in line and revenue that beat the street, $0.06 matching analyst estimate also revenue came at $5.9 billion exceeding the
science. third, you are going to see us significantly expand the expertise in our law firm, the national chamber litigation center and in other areas of our institution, in order to deal with regulations. our preference is always to work within the legislative and regulatory processes and we do that on a daily basis. but when rights have been trampled on, or regulators have overstepped their bounds, we'll take the necessary legal action. let me turn to immigration reform. america has grown and thrived because we have attracted and welcomed the most talented and the hardest working citizens of the world to our shores. immigrants teach in our universities, invest and invent in our technology companies, staff our hospitals, care for our elderly and young, harvest our food, and serve in our armed forces. given our changing demographics, we need more workers to sustain our economy, support our retired population, and to stay competitive. even with high unemployment, we have millions of job openings that go unfilled. either the workers come here to fill those jobs or the companies take all of
wily... or weird... or wonderfully the market's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day after day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. >>> 155,000 net new jobs in the month of december and the unemployment rate at 7.8% after the labor department revised the rate up a notch. positive if otherwise sluggish job gains that we've been seeing for about 30 straight months. but big gains in construction and manufacturing jobs in december support my thesis that an economic renaissance is beginning in america, if only washington would stop trying to mess things up. for more on what the jobs report said, here's christine. >> well let's take a look you've got enough jobs being created that you're absorbing new people into the workforce, but you're not lowering the unemployment rate, that's where things get
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> all right. welcome back to the floor of the new york stock exchange. time now for the closing countdown as we approach the close. pretty good day on wall street. schactman and i were just talking about this herbalife story. stock down 2%. ceo speaking on cnbc exclusively right there and that's where the stock fell. an interesting story we continue to follow. tiffany really set the tone early on for that stock. holiday sales at the low end of expectations. outlook disappointing as well raising questions about what the high-end retailers are doing. a number to watch. stock down nearly 5 has. apple, tim cook meeting with china mobile. is he going to do that deal in the market would certainly love it if he did and amazon named deutsche bank's favorite large-cap e-commerce name.
shell for being willing to cooperate on getting to the science. but as i told marvin before we stepped out onstage, in colorado, you know, just repeatedly now, shell has been there calling for stronger regulations of its own industry, agreeing with e.d.f. on how to go forward in a way that really is very meritorious. so i just want to thank you, marvin, for what shell is doing on this topic. [applause] >> you mentioned the -- that there would need to be a mix of energy. you mentioned nuclear. is there a danger that the extraordinary growth of unconventional gas and oil in america creates a sense of abundance and no longer a need to worry about renewables that marvin talked about, and nuclear, for example? >> it's certainly having an impact on investment and research and development, there's no question about it. it has slowed down. we were something like 17 nuclear reactors being considered just to keep us at 20%. nuclear is 20% of our world power mix today and that's backed off. we have four being built in the country. but you see that happening. the thing we have to worry about, agai
'm on the science committee and on the homeland security committee and lawrence livermore laboratory, they are our largest employer in the district and i want to get business and government on the same page, enable government research to create private sector jobs because i think technology is actually -- allows us to work in a bipartisan way because it knows no party. the way we communicate today is through our mobile devices and our ipads, our notebooks and so let's use technology, create new jobs, move forward. >> smart move. he's on the homeland security and tech committee and he's going to get the money for lawrence livermore lab which is in this district, politics 101, welcome to it congressman. >> thank you. >> congratulations. thanks for being here. we will be right back. [ crickets chirping ] [ traffic passing ] ♪ [ music box: lullaby ] [ man on tv, indistinct ] ♪ [ lullaby continues ] [ baby coos ] [ man announcing ] millions are still exposed to the dangers... of secondhand smoke... and some of them can't do anything about it. ♪ [ continues
science journalist debra blum, author of "the poisoner's handbook." she said cyanide is a horrible way to go. and screaming part of it. >> they'll talk about the classic death scream. almost an involuntary contraction of your dying muscles. >> it's almost a trademark of cyanide? >> it absolutely is. >> how did the poison get into khan, and who could have been responsible? the answers may rest in khan's stomach. it's one reason the medical examiner wants his body exhumed. one of the things you would clearly focus on is what was the last meal or the last food consumed. would that be of interest? >> any autopsy looks at the gastric contents. in some cases we analyze if it's relevant to the case. in this case, we would be looking at the gastric content, but that's part of any forensic autopsy. >> khan's widow is 32 years old and she's now inside running the family business. i asked her for an interview, but she said she's simply not ready to talk. she did tell me that she and her husband were very much in love and that she supports the exhumation of his body, hoping it will reveal the trut
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